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To what programms can i import Krita's brushes?

User avatar vilmasolo
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Hi. I installed several paint programms - FireAlpaca, Gimp, MyPAint, Paint Tool Sai and Sketchbook. Also i downloaded Krita's brushes from older versions (Thinking to load Photoshop brushes to Krita as well as older Krita's versions) Sure, it will be optimal to make the list of drawing programms shorter - cause it's my wiser to be good in 1-2 programms then to have limited knowledge in many.
And so as Krita is used to stop on my Windows 7, it will be resonable to load Krita's brushes (and gradients) to some other programm with similar functions (Personally i'm thinking about loading to Gimp) But i don't know if Gimp fits for it.

FireAlpaca has a short list of brushes. Can it be possible to load Krita's brushes there?
As for MyPaint, i have no plans to load brushes there - MyPaint brushes will be loaded to Gimp (i've read that it's possible) But it's interestig to me if it's possible to import MyPaint brushes to Krita or to add Krita brushes to MyPaint.

As for Tool Sai, i have cracked version (the code is already included) To say true, i have a limited knowledge what cracked version means. I prepose that i can use it for free during trial term (about a month) But i have no clear idea if i should to pay if i want to use Sai after trial term (Probably somebody knows the answer) In any case, i'm not going to load Krita brushes there. But i'd like to know if it's possible.

As for Sketchbook, i'm thinking not to use it - i have enough of programms to draw. Main reason to think about Sketchbook: brushes with fire effect. It will be good to load them to Krita or to some other of the programms i have: To Krita or to Gimp or to FireAlpaca or to MYPaint. Probably i can find some other free fire brushes and load them. What can you recommend me?

I was told about arbMate that can convert Photoshop brushes to Medibang. Probably it can convert some other brushes to some other programm. Please, tell me what is ArbMate.
And can i download Photoshop brushes separatelly from Photoshop?


May Krita force be with you.
User avatar boudewijn
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You must make a distinction between brush tips and brush presets. Brush tips come in files like Photoshop's ABR, Gimp's GBR and GIH and so on. Brush presets contain all the settings for a brush engine to define a brush you paint with. Only one of those settings is the brush tip. There is no other application that implements Krita's brush engines, so there is no way any other application can reuse Krita's brush presets. Brush tips are easier to share. Gradients can also be shared, at least between Gimp and Krita.

You've got a bunch of other questions: a cracked copy of Sai is a copy that has been illegally modified and that you illegally downloaded. You can use it, but chances are that the criminal person who modified it so you can run it without paying for it has added other nasty tricks, like a virus, ransomware or spyware.

There is a Google Summer of Code proposal to add MyPaint brushes to Krita (again), but there's no certainty the proposal will get a slot.

I have no idea about Sketchbook.

And there are plenty of ABR files available for download on platforms like deviantart.
User avatar vilmasolo
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boudewijn wrote:You must make a distinction between brush tips and brush presets. Brush tips come in files like Photoshop's ABR, Gimp's GBR and GIH and so on. Brush presets contain all the settings for a brush engine to define a brush you paint with. Only one of those settings is the brush tip. There is no other application that implements Krita's brush engines, so there is no way any other application can reuse Krita's brush presets. Brush tips are easier to share. Gradients can also be shared, at least between Gimp and Krita.

You've got a bunch of other questions: a cracked copy of Sai is a copy that has been illegally modified and that you illegally downloaded. You can use it, but chances are that the criminal person who modified it so you can run it without paying for it has added other nasty tricks, like a virus, ransomware or spyware.

There is a Google Summer of Code proposal to add MyPaint brushes to Krita (again), but there's no certainty the proposal will get a slot.

I have no idea about Sketchbook.

And there are plenty of ABR files available for download on platforms like deviantart.


Thanks for the answer. It helped me to clear up the situation. I'll make an effort to load Krita's brushtips to Gimp.
I'll ask about Abr files on Deviantart.
Deleted cracked Sai. Will use paid version (if i'll decide to use Sai)

And i have some questions to you as to Krita Developer:
Will Krita be good with Windows 8? When Windows 8 support term will be over? And i have analogue questions about Windows 10.
I'm not hurry to renew Windows 7. Will it be problemsome to go on to use it after the end of supported term? I mean how it'll affect on my PC work.


May Krita force be with you.
ahabgreybeard
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@vilmasolo

Have you considered trying Linux instead of being worried and affected by Windows 7/8/10 support?

Ubuntu and Linux Mint are generally regarded as quite suitable for first time users and the MATE Desktop Environment is (in my opinion) a good one for moving from Windows.

If your laptop has a SATA drive, you can get a 120GB SSD to replace it and give it a performance boost too. (This would give you about 100GB free for your personal data with Linux installed.) That way, you could put the old Windows drive back in if you wanted to. That's what I did on my old Windows 7 laptop and I never went back to using Windows on it.
User avatar boudewijn
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Ahabgreybeard has a good point. It's really hard to support Windows 7, and Windows 7 is really insecure. I personally liked the UX of Windows 8, but Microsoft wants to drop that in the oubliette as soon as they can, too. We do support Windows 10, but honestly, nearly none of the developers use it from day to day, because it's just too inconvenient and intrusive.
User avatar vilmasolo
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ahabgreybeard wrote:@vilmasolo

Have you considered trying Linux instead of being worried and affected by Windows 7/8/10 support?

Ubuntu and Linux Mint are generally regarded as quite suitable for first time users and the MATE Desktop Environment is (in my opinion) a good one for moving from Windows.

If your laptop has a SATA drive, you can get a 120GB SSD to replace it and give it a performance boost too. (This would give you about 100GB free for your personal data with Linux installed.) That way, you could put the old Windows drive back in if you wanted to. That's what I did on my old Windows 7 laptop and I never went back to using Windows on it.


Thanks for the answer. I've never thought about Linux. I have no laptop, only PC. Well, i don't deny that i'm thinking about drawing i-pad with stylos. And it will be cool twice if it will be gaming i-pad. It will be resonable to install Linux on it. In the same time i can't tell that Windows is too problemsome for me.


May Krita force be with you.
User avatar vilmasolo
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boudewijn wrote:Ahabgreybeard has a good point. It's really hard to support Windows 7, and Windows 7 is really insecure. I personally liked the UX of Windows 8, but Microsoft wants to drop that in the oubliette as soon as they can, too. We do support Windows 10, but honestly, nearly none of the developers use it from day to day, because it's just too inconvenient and intrusive.


Thanks for the answer. As i answered to Ahabgreybeard, i'll think to use Linux if i'll allow myself drawing I-Pad with stylos. In the same time i can't say that Windows is too problemsome for me. In any case support for Windows 7 isn't over yet. And i have no experience at all in using Linux. Also i have a need in Windows. Cause Sketchbook has no Linux version - i'm going to use Sketchbook cause i need this programm, too. So, it will be optimal to renew Windows and after that to think about adding Linux.
Also i have no experience at all about installing new OS on existing PC (only about installing OS on new PC) So, it's naturally to ask:
How new OS will affect on everything i have in my PC? I mean files, internet bookmarks and programms inc paid ones) Should i coppy them on some flash-card and reinstall on new OS? Though it will be enough to coppy them on Disk D (Though i don't know how to coppy bookmarks) But there's one moment: My programms are for Windows 7. It won't be difficult to install versions for Windows 10. But will it be technologically able to add brushtips and gradients from Win7 versions to Win10 version?

Last edited by vilmasolo on Sat Apr 20, 2019 7:16 am, edited 1 time in total.


May Krita force be with you.
User avatar tymond
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If you install Linux Mint, it will detect Windows and ask if you want to install Mint alongside Windows. I never used this options, though. But if it works correctly - and I don't see any reason to assume otherwise - your Windows will be (nearly) intact; you'll have all of your programs etc. The only thing that will change is the space on your hard disk, which will decrease because you need some space for Linux too.

Next time you turn on your computer, you'll see a menu to choose Mint or Windows. Default will be Mint, probably (it can be changed).

From Mint, you'll be able to access Windows files; it probably won't be possible the other way around because Windows doesn't support system files that Linuxes prefer.

Before you do any changes to your computer, please make sure you have a backup of all important files and programs - just in case something bad happen (eg. you choose wrong option during installation process and Mint will replace your Windows).

I personally prefer Cinnamon desktop environment (you can choose them when you download; google "Mint Cinnamon" and "Mint MATE" and choose whichever you think looks nicer). It is very very easy, easier than Windows I believe.
ahabgreybeard
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When you say " drawing I-Pad with stylos", I think you mean a drawing tablet with a stylus. The i-Pad is an Apple tablet-computer product.

If you want a drawing tablet, the Wacom range works well on Linux and other people will be able to tell you about Huion or other tablets on Linux.

As a personal choice, I would not install Linux alongside Windows since that increases the possibility of problems which would be difficult for a first time user to understand and fix.

If you have a desktop PC, it's very easy to change the hard drive and you can install Linux on a 120GB SSD (or another ordinary hard drive) and have your old Windows hard drive stored safely somewhere so you can swap between the new Linux drive and the old Windows drive, depending which you want to use.
That is what I do when I want to swap between Linux and Windows 10 on my desktop PC because it's not difficult and it's the safest way - there is no interaction and no possibility of interaction between the two systems. (I rarely use Windows 10 nowadays though.)

The programs/applications that you have on Windows will not run on Linux. Your data files can be transferred between them by using a USB stick that has been formatted as FAT32. (This is the guarenteed way, there are other ways .) Your browser bookmarks can be exported to a .html file and transferred then imported into your Linux system browser (Firefox, Palemoon, Opera, Waterfox, Vivaldi, ..... all free). Firefox, Thunderbird, GIMP and Inkscape (and many other applications) are included as standard on most Linux distributions. Installing additional applications, such as Krita, is very easy.

Whatever you decide to do, you should watch the many YouTube tutorial videos first to get a good idea of what is involved in installing and using a Linux distribution and be prepared for confusion and frustration at first. There are also many written tutorials in various places and the Linux Mint and Ubuntu internet forums are very helpful and active places to get information and advice.
User avatar vilmasolo
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tymond wrote:If you install Linux Mint, it will detect Windows and ask if you want to install Mint alongside Windows. I never used this options, though. But if it works correctly - and I don't see any reason to assume otherwise - your Windows will be (nearly) intact; you'll have all of your programs etc. The only thing that will change is the space on your hard disk, which will decrease because you need some space for Linux too.

Next time you turn on your computer, you'll see a menu to choose Mint or Windows. Default will be Mint, probably (it can be changed).

From Mint, you'll be able to access Windows files; it probably won't be possible the other way around because Windows doesn't support system files that Linuxes prefer.

Before you do any changes to your computer, please make sure you have a backup of all important files and programs - just in case something bad happen (eg. you choose wrong option during installation process and Mint will replace your Windows).

I personally prefer Cinnamon desktop environment (you can choose them when you download; google "Mint Cinnamon" and "Mint MATE" and choose whichever you think looks nicer). It is very very easy, easier than Windows I believe.


Thanks for the answer. It gives me ground for new thoughts.


May Krita force be with you.
User avatar vilmasolo
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ahabgreybeard wrote:When you say " drawing I-Pad with stylos", I think you mean a drawing tablet with a stylus. The i-Pad is an Apple tablet-computer product.

If you want a drawing tablet, the Wacom range works well on Linux and other people will be able to tell you about Huion or other tablets on Linux.

As a personal choice, I would not install Linux alongside Windows since that increases the possibility of problems which would be difficult for a first time user to understand and fix.

If you have a desktop PC, it's very easy to change the hard drive and you can install Linux on a 120GB SSD (or another ordinary hard drive) and have your old Windows hard drive stored safely somewhere so you can swap between the new Linux drive and the old Windows drive, depending which you want to use.
That is what I do when I want to swap between Linux and Windows 10 on my desktop PC because it's not difficult and it's the safest way - there is no interaction and no possibility of interaction between the two systems. (I rarely use Windows 10 nowadays though.)

The programs/applications that you have on Windows will not run on Linux. Your data files can be transferred between them by using a USB stick that has been formatted as FAT32. (This is the guarenteed way, there are other ways .) Your browser bookmarks can be exported to a .html file and transferred then imported into your Linux system browser (Firefox, Palemoon, Opera, Waterfox, Vivaldi, ..... all free). Firefox, Thunderbird, GIMP and Inkscape (and many other applications) are included as standard on most Linux distributions. Installing additional applications, such as Krita, is very easy.

Whatever you decide to do, you should watch the many YouTube tutorial videos first to get a good idea of what is involved in installing and using a Linux distribution and be prepared for confusion and frustration at first. There are also many written tutorials in various places and the Linux Mint and Ubuntu internet forums are very helpful and active places to get information and advice.


Thanks for the answer. I have what to study on the Forums.


May Krita force be with you.

 
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