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Should i stick to Windows or switch to KDE Neon?

felixbauerschaefer
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Hi I'm Felix Bauerschäfer,

i am 18 y/o currently in an apprentinceship for Media-Design i more then ocassionally play games i had a couple of experinces with Linux mainly Ubunutu/Linux Mint but i had also my fingers at trying out juicy stuff like openSUSE and SteamOS i even played with the thought looking at Elementary OS a other day.

But to be fair im still not blown away by Linux in general with the distros and what they offer. Maybe i just have to high expectations of what Linux may be.

(Not so important :< )
I kinda wanna know if this statement is true that Updates can fracture the architure of the whole system? Also a question that comes up when i think about changing to Linux is if i should stick to the LTS version or go with the standard version.

The most common reason why I didnt yet change it is the actual lack of support on programs i use everyday like the Creative Cloud of Adobe.
And the thought that's stuck in my head is that i can't be playing a highly graphic astonishing game again like Crysis or Battlefield breaks my gamer heart. While Vulkan could potentially change that in the future i just havent seen any support for it other then simpler games (correct me if i'm wrong).

Oh and probably most important question should i stay on Windows because Linux can't support my new hardware yet!

    Computer Specifications

    Operating system: Microsoft Windows 10 Pro Edition
    Power supply: be quiet! Straight Power 10-CM 6

    Mainboard: MSI B350 PC Mate
    CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 1600 - 3.20 GHz
    GPU: AMD Radeon Asus 7950 3GB (Currently running AMD Crimson 17.9.3)
    RAM: Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 16GB 3200MHz currently only running on 2133MHz even with new bios version....
    SSD: Samsung SSD 840 EVO 120GB
    HDD: SAMSUNG HD204UI 2TB

Thanks
Felix Bauerschäfer
vandecappelle
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I would use the Linux OS, Because we Know anything Linux makes is better than anything Windows ever made, as far as OS go.

My Computer, which I call My Editing Beast, runs Linux Mint 18,2 Sonya Cinnamon only. But if you asked me that 2 months ago up to a year ago, I would have also said I had windows 7 Pro on the machine, but two months ago, I kicked Windows of this Computer.
Clancularius
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If you have specific programs that you have to use for your apprenticeship, that only run on windows, then you can't really get rid of it. That said, you can always dual boot. I have Windows for a few specific programs but for everything else, I use Kubuntu.
Clancularius
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Saw this and thought it may be of interest to you http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/inst ... loud-linux
valoriez
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felixbauerschaefer wrote:Hi I'm Felix Bauerschäfer,

i am 18 y/o currently in an apprentinceship for Media-Design i more then ocassionally play games i had a couple of experinces with Linux mainly Ubunutu/Linux Mint but i had also my fingers at trying out juicy stuff like openSUSE and SteamOS i even played with the thought looking at Elementary OS a other day.

But to be fair im still not blown away by Linux in general with the distros and what they offer. Maybe i just have to high expectations of what Linux may be.

(Not so important :< )
I kinda wanna know if this statement is true that Updates can fracture the architure of the whole system? Also a question that comes up when i think about changing to Linux is if i should stick to the LTS version or go with the standard version.

The most common reason why I didnt yet change it is the actual lack of support on programs i use everyday like the Creative Cloud of Adobe.
And the thought that's stuck in my head is that i can't be playing a highly graphic astonishing game again like Crysis or Battlefield breaks my gamer heart. While Vulkan could potentially change that in the future i just havent seen any support for it other then simpler games (correct me if i'm wrong).

Oh and probably most important question should i stay on Windows because Linux can't support my new hardware yet!

    Computer Specifications

    Operating system: Microsoft Windows 10 Pro Edition
    Power supply: be quiet! Straight Power 10-CM 6

    Mainboard: MSI B350 PC Mate
    CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 1600 - 3.20 GHz
    GPU: AMD Radeon Asus 7950 3GB (Currently running AMD Crimson 17.9.3)
    RAM: Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 16GB 3200MHz currently only running on 2133MHz even with new bios version....
    SSD: Samsung SSD 840 EVO 120GB
    HDD: SAMSUNG HD204UI 2TB

Thanks
Felix Bauerschäfer


Hi Felix, why not download Neon or whatever you want to try out, burn onto a thumb drive, and try it out? You will be able to see if all your equipment works well. Mint has just announced that they plan to stop issuing a Plasma edition in the future, so if you like the Debian/Ubuntu ecosystem, Neon, Kubuntu and Debian live are all worth downloading and trying out.

Valorie


Image
User avatar ShelLuser
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felixbauerschaefer wrote:I kinda wanna know if this statement is true that Updates can fracture the architure of the whole system? Also a question that comes up when i think about changing to Linux is if i should stick to the LTS version or go with the standard version.

I know you crossed it out but I'd still like to comment if you don't mind...

Careful with Linux LTS versions because they're not so "long term" as you might think. See, the main problem is that although distributions often apply a so called freeze for that specific version the underlying development and ditto release cycle continues. Meaning that if you upgrade from one LTS version ot the other you're not simply hopping versions. You're actually skipping several regular releases in the process.

Here you can see a Ubuntu (LTS) release chart and you'll quickly see what I mean. An upgrade from 16.04 LTS to 18.04 LTS basically skips 3(!) major releases. As a rule of thumb: a minor version upgrade is usually pretty harmless, but a major version upgrade not so much. There are no guarantees anyway.

I had hoped they'd would have improved this support model by now but I guess they didn't. This mess once cost me 2 days worth of stress because our server never cleanly upgraded so we basically ended up having to install all versions in between in order to get things cleanly working again. Never again for me.

If you want LTS then why not give FreeBSD a look? Before continue: support for Linux is much more mainstream than it is for FreeBSD. So the results may not fully be as you'd like, depending on the involved hardware and used applications.

But it'll be tough to beat their support cycle. For example... Version 10.0 (now unsupported) was released in January 2014. See this link for an overview. During that same year 10.1 was released (November). Now, minor version upgrades on FreeBSD are as harmless as a regular update on Linux, although obviously care should be taken because there are no guarantees. Alas: you'll notice that there's plenty of overlap between versions, however.. they're all part of the same major release. So if you now look at the currently supported releases you'll notice that the current version 10.4 will be supported until the 31st of October 2018. So this doesn't only give you an effective support cycle of at least 4 years it's also a support cycle which will never require you to skip major versions. When 10.4 get's EOL'd then the version to upgrade to will be 11 (probably 11.2 or 11.3). No skipping of major versions, therefor although the upgrade will always come with a few risks attached they're still fully calculated for. Upgrading from 10 => 11 is a whole lot better than upgrading from 16 to 18.

Please note that I'm not trying to make it look as if BSD can be the perfect replacement. It's definitely not the same as Linux. But having said that, it also has no problems running KDE :)

felixbauerschaefer wrote:The most common reason why I didnt yet change it is the actual lack of support on programs i use everyday like the Creative Cloud of Adobe. And the thought that's stuck in my head is that i can't be playing a highly graphic astonishing game again like Crysis or Battlefield breaks my gamer heart. While Vulkan could potentially change that in the future i just havent seen any support for it other then simpler games (correct me if i'm wrong).

It all depends on what you're using your computer for. Also: virtualization can go a long way too. You could always start to pick up VirtualBox and then use that on your Windows machine in order to experiment and play around with a Unix-like machine.
airdrik
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There's also the Periodic vs. Rolling Release models.
Most major distros follow Periodic Release models so that developers and system admins have a stable set of packages to build against or otherwise be familiar with. These generally have an upgrade path for moving from major version to major version, and people are often able to upgrade a single system across multiple versions with some usually minor hiccups. For LTS releases like Ubuntu's, you should expect to be able to upgrade from one LTS to the next using the upgrade system that they provide, just as you should expect to upgrade from one regular release to the next; and you shouldn't assume that everything will break just because you're apparently jumping 3 major versions because they are expected to have tested the LTS-to-LTS upgrade path. Of course it's generally best to do some testing of your own to see how your system may handle it, and be wary if you install from 3rd-party sources as those may interfere with or break in the process.

A few distros follow Rolling Release models where you install once and just keep it up-to-date. With these distros there may be occasional instability (depending on the release management of the distro selected), but that's usually ironed out pretty quickly. Thus it is assumed that you will update on a regular basis to keep up with the times, and that regular updates shouldn't break your system. Arch is the most popular option here, but I've been using PClinuxOS at home for years with very little trouble.


airdrik, proud to be a member of KDE forums since 2008-Dec.

 
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