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non-linear sound volume control

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the_skif
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non-linear sound volume control

Fri Apr 10, 2009 9:27 am
kmix and other programs that allow user to control sound volume behave a bit strange. That is because they use linear scale. But human ear perceives the change of sound level in logarithmic scale. It's a good practice (used in many programs) to compensate it by using non-linear volume scale. I've noticed that the best way is to use SQRT():

Volume = SQRT( current_slider_position / max_slider_position )

it would be great if you'd do this in the future versions
User avatar bcooksley
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RE: linear sound volume control

Fri Apr 10, 2009 10:10 am
Please only post problems relating to the KDE Community Forums in the "Forum Feedback & Help" Forum. Moved to Graphics & Multimedia.


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Götz
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Re: linear sound volume control

Sat Jul 11, 2009 4:26 am
The volume control should be logarithmic, all modern O.S. use log volume scale.

I think this would be better if converted to a Brainstorm.


What I hear, I forget. What I say, I remember. What I do, I understand. –Tao Te Ching/Laozi
L_V
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Re: linear sound volume control

Tue Aug 04, 2009 7:36 pm
This is true.

Moreover, don't know if it is related but when kmix master channel level is set to minimal, the sound is not off.
This was working fine with KDE3.5 with the same hardware.
Götz
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Re: linear sound volume control

Wed Aug 05, 2009 1:58 am
L_V wrote:This is true.

Moreover, don't know if it is related but when kmix master channel level is set to minimal, the sound is not off.
This was working fine with KDE3.5 with the same hardware.


I have the same problem, but also with alsamixer, so I don't thing this is kmix fault, but who knows...


What I hear, I forget. What I say, I remember. What I do, I understand. –Tao Te Ching/Laozi
User avatar bcooksley
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Re: linear sound volume control

Wed Aug 05, 2009 5:25 am
If the problem also occurs with ALSAMixer, then the problem is a change in the behaviour of ALSA, which KDE does not have control over.


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User avatar sandsmark
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Re: linear sound volume control

Sun Aug 16, 2009 3:10 am
FWIW, Phonon supports getting volume in both logarithmic scales and linear scales, so switching to changing volume with a logarithmic scale should be pretty trivial in any Phonon based app.


User avatar TheBlackCat
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non-linear sound volume control

Wed Aug 19, 2009 6:33 pm
Since this is a feature request I moved it to brainstorm, and changed the title to reflect the desired feature rather than the problem.

As for the idea, I think doing it in logarithmic is the best solution. Since humans percieve things on a logarithmic scale (everything, not just sound), it would be better to use that.


Man is the lowest-cost, 150-pound, nonlinear, all-purpose computer system which can be mass-produced by unskilled labor.
-NASA in 1965
User avatar MirzaD
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non-linear sound volume control

Thu Aug 20, 2009 8:41 pm
I agree, it should be logarithmic.
PS..
Some studies show that even more precise approximation of human hearing scale is based upon Fibonacci Sequence of numbers.
User avatar Angel Blue01
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non-linear sound volume control

Fri Aug 28, 2009 7:08 pm
I'm confused, mostly because I don't understand logarithms :) , so could someone explain what it means that humans perceive the world logarithmically?

That said, I'm for UIs that approximate the way humans actually work, so I voted for it :p


Proudly dual-booting openSUSE 11.1 with KDE 4.3 and Windows Vista on a Toshiba A205-S4577 since July 2007.
hellblade
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non-linear sound volume control

Fri Aug 28, 2009 9:15 pm
Angel Blue01 wrote:I'm confused, mostly because I don't understand logarithms :) , so could someone explain what it means that humans perceive the world logarithmically?

A simple explanation is that if you increase the volume linearly (say from 1% to 10%) your ear will hear it only twice as loud than before, instead of ten times.
I hope I was clear:)
kolAflash
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non-linear sound volume control

Thu Feb 04, 2010 5:33 pm
Good idea! Please implement that! :-)

I didn't really liked that linear behaviour since I'm using KDE. And slowly it's really starting to annoy me...

Because of the linear behaviour, the lower part of the volume bars become really useless.
From the half to the lower end, it's just the difference between very very very quiet and completely no sound...

Thanks!
kolAflash
Götz
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non-linear sound volume control

Sun Apr 04, 2010 10:23 pm
I would like to know why is voting locked?
Has Phonon nothing to do with this?


What I hear, I forget. What I say, I remember. What I do, I understand. –Tao Te Ching/Laozi
Atronach
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Re: non-linear sound volume control

Thu Feb 07, 2013 5:19 pm
Hi,
I have probably a relevant issue. When I set the Master channel in Kmix to let's say 51% then Alsamixer shows 20 so the global volume is to low. I have to set the volume in kmix to at least 80 and then i got only few steps in kmix to get the maximum volume. I guess this is probably the logarithmic stuff discussed here.
But then when using pulseaudio I get volume control in kmix nicely equal to the one in alsamixer. Is this an expected behaviour or not? More about my issue I've been discussing here: viewtopic.php?f=225&t=109454. I would therefore appreciate some confirmation whether this logarithmic stuff was implemented. Thanks.

 
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